nearForm sponsors Node.js Italy conference
By Michele Capra

Last week, I had the pleasure of hosting the fourth annual Italian Node.js conference. I’ve been organizing the conference since it started four years ago on September 24, 2011. This year, nearForm was the platinum sponsor, marking the latest demonstration of the company’s remarkable commitment to the Node.js community.

It was a great one-day conference, with ten talks and three hands-on workshops. It always makes me really happy as a conference organizer to see so many people coming to Node.js Italy from all over Europe, and even from the US, to give generously of their time and to share their latest insights about Node.js.

Nodejs Confit

The main conference room a few minutes before the conference started.

The day started with a keynote address by the famous Node.js core committer Bert Belder. Bert delivered an outstanding talk on the state of Node.js, the Node.js foundation, how to include more contributors, and how to strike a balance between the startup and enterprise worlds.

After a good coffee break, the conference continued with an impressive talk by Julian Cheal about his “charming robots”. In parallel to the main track, in another room, Nitesh Thakrar held a workshop on how to deliver a real-world Node.js solution using IBM Bluemix.

The morning passed very quickly, with talks coming thick and fast, from “Components as microservices in the front-end world” by Matteo Figus to “Deterministic deployments with Node.js” delivered by the awesome Massimiliano Mantione, an ex-Google V8 software engineer.

After a very good Italian lunch, with all the best local food and drink, and a good espresso, it was time to start a very intensive afternoon. The main afternoon track kicked off with nearForm’s Marco Piraccini, who spoke about how to implement a controller for a home automation system with Node.js and a Raspberry Pi. At the same time, in a neighboring room, there was another nearForm team with Dean McDonnell and Matteo Collina. Dean and Matteo delivered a hands-on workshop on developing microservices. They guided attendees through the process of building and deploying an example of a real microservices system. They used a number of technologies including Node.js, MQTT, Docker and InfluxDB.

 

Dean McDonnell and Matteo Collina mentoring at the microservices workshop

Dean McDonnell and Matteo Collina mentoring at the microservices workshop.

In yet another room, Mathias Buus held a workshop on P2P and distributed  programming with Node.js. Attendees had the opportunity to start developing  P2P applications, such as distributed state, and ended up with a “mad science” P2P Node.js app.

Mathias Buus and Eduardo Sorribas mentoring at the P2P and distributed programming workshop.

Mathias Buus and Eduardo Sorribas mentoring at the P2P and distributed programming workshop.

Back to the main track. Golo Roden discussed the JSON Lines format for pushing out notifications, followed by Matteo Murgida, who showed how Siemens has been using Node.js in its technology stack for its own energy management system.

After another coffee break, it was time for Gleb Bahmutov to demonstrate how to remove lots and lots of unnecessary code from Node.js applications. Then Thorsten Lorenz showed attendees some practical examples of how to debug a Node.js application using the latest features added to the V8 engine in io.js.

The last talk, given by Emanuale Rampichini, was about Emanuale’s experiences building a desktop application using Node.js and WebKit.

Then it was time to say goodbye to everyone and to announce the next Italian Node.js conference, which will be held in Fall 2016. Until then – Ciao!

 

Conference organizers, speakers and some attendees at the annual post-conference Italian dinner.

Conference organizers, speakers and some attendees at the annual post-conference Italian dinner.


 

 

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